Introduction to Economics for Social Negotiators

Introduction and Background

One of the key roles of workers’ organizations (trade unions) is to influence economic and social policies to promote the welfare of their members and society at large. Over the years, unions have been able to perform this role through the use of the collective bargaining processes and regular policy engagements. Whiles some successes have been achieved, a lot still needs to be done.

The speed at which the world of work is changing, in the face of the fourth industrial revolution, demands that unions find new ways of doing things. Capitalists want to maximize profit without worrying about collective bargaining and social responsibility on the part of workers. Outsourcing, sub-contracting, informalisation and casualisation of employment have become the norm. The very survival of trade unions is at risk. Unions must therefore make good use of the policy space for better outcomes for workers and their families.

Over the years, the TUC-Ghana has offered a number of educational and training programmes for its national unions to enhance their capacities to intervene on democratic, economic and social issues. Many of these trainings have focused on areas such as industrial relations, social protection, gender, governance among others. One topical area that has lagged behind is the subject of economics. There are many trade union members who have not had the opportunity to receive proper training on economic concepts and their application in the world of work.

Introduction to Economics for Social Negotiators

Introduction to Economics for Social Negotiators

One of the key roles of workers’ organizations (trade unions) is to influence economic and social policies to promote the welfare of their members and society at large.  Over the years, unions have been able to perform this role through the use of the collective bargaining processes and regular policy engagements.  Whiles some successes have been achieved, a lot still needs to be done.